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Between 2007-2012, a team of researchers at the Healthy Populations Institute at Dalhousie University were funded by the Heart and Stroke Foundation Canada and Canadian Institutes for Health Research for a research project called: Optimizing investments in the built environment to reduce youth obesity: The ENACT Study.
ENACT aimed to understand the role of the built environment (e.g., land mix, walk-ability, recreation facilities), and the policies that affect its use, in contribution to youth obesity in the Halifax Regional Municipality. 
In 2012, further studies expanded on the ENACT project to explore both
physical activity and dietary intake, which is important in building a greater understanding of the role of the built environment. 

Our Research

Froogie is the result of multiple research projects exploring youth health. Learn more about how Froogie was developed.

The History of this Research

Phase

1

Building the Foundation

A 2013 study Privileging physical activity over healthy eating: 'Time' to Choose? found that:

  • Parents and youth report that they are over-scheduled in ways that limit options for healthy meal preparation 

  • Healthy eating is often sacrificed due to the scheduling of leisure-time physical activities 

  • Families are found to be the target audience to encourage healthy eating strategies

Phase

2

Role of TIME & the current need

Mobile App Version #1
TIME Crunch for Health

Phase

3

In 2015, the first version of this App was designed based on research results to encourage parents and children in healthy eating
Based on user testing, we learned the need to
simplify the App for user benefit and functionality.

Phase

4

Froogie

The Froogie (pronunciation: froo-jee) App has been informed by all of this previous research to provide families a fun and interactive way to track their daily fruit and vegetable intake. 
Highlights of the Froogie App:​

  • History of the name: Blending of the words "fruits" and "veggies"

  • Selection of Characters: Efforts were made to ensure gender neutrality and cultural inclusion for Froogie characters to be broadly appealing and inclusive

  • Learning Opportunities: Notifications appear to encourage users to eat and track vegetables and fruits, such as fun facts and tips to incorporate vegetables and fruits into daily routines

  • Motivation to Track: As users track their daily intake, new Froogie characters are available

  • Embedded health goals: the App is designed to create a 60% vegetable to 40% fruit ratio of daily servings to ensure a healthy balance of both 

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Healthy Populations Institute (HPI), Dalhousie University, 1318 Robie Street, Box 15000, Halifax, NS, B3H 3E2

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